Sacramento Man Convicted of Trying to Rape Homeless Woman

Yolo County Release  |  2018-07-05

WEST SACRAMENTO, CA (MPG) - July 5, 2018- District Attorney Jeff Reisig announced today that on July 2, 2018, a Yolo County jury convicted 40-year -old Sacramento man Lester Louis Jones of assault with intent to commit rape and other crimes related to an assault of a homeless woman in West Sacramento. The jury also found true allegations that he had served prior terms in state prison.

On March 24, 2018, Jones attacked a homeless woman who was sleeping under an eave at the library on Merkley Avenue at 4:40 am.  She was huddled up to protect herself from a rainy West Sacramento night.  Jones chased her into the street where he brazenly stripped her of her clothing while she was pinned on the ground.  The victim was able to call 911 and tell the police dispatcher her location during the violent attack. 

District Attorney Reisig lauded the courage of the victim who fought off her attacker alone in the street, and the immediate response and pursuit by West Sacramento police officers working the graveyard shift.  “Our homeless population is very vulnerable, and this victim had the courage to fight for herself until West Sacramento Police officers were able to pursue and apprehend this brutal attacker.” 

The Honorable Paul Richardson presided over the trial and is scheduled to sentence Jones on August 14, 2018.  Jones faces up to sixteen years in prison and will be required to register as a sexual offender.

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DA Schubert Talks Community Challenges at Carmichael Chamber Luncheon

By Rich Peters, MPG Editor  |  2018-07-05

At the Carmichael Chamber of Commerce luncheon, DA Anne Marie Schubert was joined by Sacramento Sheriff Officer Bill Roberts, CHP Officer Brian Lewis and Sacramento Fire Department Officer Christopher Dargan. Photo by Susan Maxwell Skinner

CARMICHAEL, CA (MPG) - “How much our community thrives is one hundred percent dependent on the people who are willing to participate in that,” said Sacramento County District Attorney Anne Marie Schubert. “There is no question in my mind that Sacramento has been faced with extraordinary challenges in the last few months and there is no person probably more aware of that than me.”

District Attorney Schubert was June’s Carmichael Chamber luncheon guest speaker, packing the room. Schubert addressed a lot of topics, including the East Area Rapist case, but mostly stuck to what she feels is most important right now – the challenges that face the community.

“My view as the DA, and I say this often, is what I call the blueprint to public safety: prosecution, prevention and innovation,” said Schubert. “We’re going to stand up for victims, we’re going to hold people accountable – if you deserve to go to prison, buddy, you’re going – that’s what I say. But I also believe one hundred percent that if we can prevent crime on the front end, we are far better off on the other end.”

Schubert is a firm believer in education being the answer to lowering the crime rate. “85 percent of our prison population is comprised of individuals that were either chronically truant or absent from school,” she stated. “You cannot expect police and prosecutors to solve the problems that we face in the community alone.”

Other issues that Schubert touched on were homelessness and mental health – especially in the Carmichael area. “Aside from the East Area Rapist, which is probably now the hottest topic, the hottest topic was always two things: ‘What are you going to do about homelessness? What are you going to do about mental health?’”

She touched on the negative affect that the homeless population has on the community’s economy and the complexity of solving that problem. “Public safety, education, healthcare – everything is interrelated,” said Schubert. “If we do not have a vibrant community, if we are not safe as a community, if you have people, transients, using drugs, doing everything on the doorsteps of your business – that’s going to affect your economic vibrancy.”

Schubert continued, “We have seen in Sacramento County and across this country an increase of homelessness of 30 percent (in the last two years). That’s a very significant issue – very challenging, very complex – but it’s not something that police and prosecutors can solve on their own. It takes a community.”

Schubert was raised in Sacramento, went to local schools and is raising her children in the region. She was elected as Sacramento County's District Attorney in 2014. She has 28 years of law enforcement experience, fighting for victims, and putting dangerous career criminal behind bars. As District Attorney and a local prosecutor, Schubert has sent some of the area’s most notorious and dangerous criminals – murderers, rapists and child molesters – to state prison.

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SACRAMENTO REGION, CA (MPG) - The video game industry is rarely labeled as “original,” and this year’s Electronics Entertainment Expo (E3) illustrated exactly why. Video games’ largest publishers showcased Metro: Exodus, Dying Light 2, Days Gone, The Last of Us Part 2, Rage 2, Gears 5 and Fallout 76. Their common thread? Every one of these flagship, multi-million dollar titles is a post-apocalyptic action game, usually with some sort of zombie or zombie-like enemy. 2018’s store shelves will be utterly saturated with games in the vein of Mad Max and 28 Days Later, and yet despite the saturation, every one of them will likely sell exceptionally well.

Video games have an utter obsession with the post-apocalypse going back decades, to an extent not reflected in any other popular media. The two seem to be a match made in heaven; a primary allure of video games is the ability to escape one's own life and do anything they desire. When a developer is tasked with contextualizing utter freedom in terms of a logically coherent, immersive game world, where better to turn than an anarchic wasteland? Without the binding ties of society and rule of law, the player can believably do whatever they want without the logical necessity of some in-game police coming down on their heads. Even linear, cinematic experiences with little real player freedom benefit from the narrative shortcuts a post-apocalypse allows. Why are we killing thousands and thousands of zombies/people? Easy, this world is kill or be killed in a battle for survival, so further moral justification for Mass violence seems, from the writer's perspective, otherwise unnecessary.

Such justification feeds into why the trend is stronger now than it's ever been. Developers leveraged the computing power of the new generation of consoles not to create photorealism, but to create massive, living worlds in which players can roam free. Open worlds became “stylish” as franchises that were once linear began to expand with huge environments to explore. And as video games began to lean more and more into their most unique artistic asset, the ability to create a sense of player freedom, the need for justifications for such complete freedom spiked upwards. As a result, we have E3 2018, where game after game resorts to the post-apocalypse as its narrative shortcut.

This is hardly a criticism; because video games aren't primarily a narrative medium, narrative shortcuts are easily excused if they accommodate exciting gameplay and interesting worlds, both of which post-apocalypse games often excel at. And even then, video games have occasionally used post-apocalyptic settings not as writing crutches but as tools to explore the complex moral questions of survival and freedom; 2013’s The Last of Us did exactly that, and is widely considered the best-written game ever made (though its incredible-looking sequel may be looking to snatch that title from its predecessor). There's a reason why, despite the saturation, the industry is showing few signs of fatigue. The post-apocalypse both literally and figuratively, remains extensively unexplored, and video games are uniquely positioned to trek into the lawless wilderness.

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Korea and World War III - Almost

By Jerald Drobesh, US AIR FORCE  |  2018-07-05

McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II.

SACRAMENTO REGION, CA (MPG) - Recently there has been high tension and talks of a possible confrontation and even a nuclear war with North Korea.  But this is not the first time we have been in this position with them. 

In the early 1970s, as a Captain in the US Air Force, I was assigned to Kunsan Air Force Base on the west coast of South Korea. This was an old US Air Force Base from the Korean War days, in the 1950s. At that time, I was the Air Force Chief of Aircraft Maintenance at the base, and part of my job was to prepare our assigned F-4 Fighter/Bombers for emergency launch with nuclear weapons, if the situation required it.

The F-4 twin jet Fighter/ Bomber was, at the time, was one of the fastest and best aircraft ever built.  My job required that I have a Top Secret Security Clearance, because I was required to brief the Wing Commander on the status of all our assigned aircraft, and sit in on all Top Secret briefings about the status of the North Korean armed forces and their preparations for War.  I remember well, as if it was yesterday. It was one of the most important briefings I had ever attended.  It was the early 1970s, and by the time the briefing was over, I knew that we could be at war at any minute.  

The North Korean forces, according to the briefing, were moving their fighters, bombers, tanks, military equipment, and soldiers up close to the border between North and South Korea. This would put them just minutes flying time from our aircraft at Kunsan AFB. This had never happened before and I remember thinking, at the time, that our base may not exist after the next few days, or sooner. 

That night I walked down to the flight line where our F-4 Fighter/Bombers were stationed and ready for war. My job was to check with the airmen assigned to repair and prepare the aircraft, and to have them all ready for launch if the orders were given by Headquarters. We were an inch away from World War III and I could feel it in the air. 

That night, I talked to my maintenance airmen assigned to the aircraft. They didn’t know, at the time, how close we were to war and I couldn’t tell them.  There wasn’t a need at that time for them to know, but they were ready. All the F-4 aircraft that were flyable were loaded with bombs and ready for immediate takeoff to their assigned targets.  I remember thinking that night on the flightline that this could be it.   

I enjoyed my job and all the assigned men were great to work with.  Being that I once flew jets myself in the Air Force, I knew how the pilots must have felt - that they may never see their families again - if we went to war.  This was the real world and possibly the end of our beautiful planet as we knew it.  I had a difficult time sleeping that night.  It’s hard to tell someone who hasn’t been stationed on the front lines with nuclear weapons involved what it feels like.  But that’s what we were trained for - and we all knew what was at stake.  

Fortunately, we all survived or I wouldn’t be writing this article.  For some reason the North Koreans began to remove their jets, tanks, equipment, and troops back from the border, and I never heard why.  At that time, Chinese and Russian troops were supporting the North Korean communist troops and maybe their leaders realized that once a nuclear war started in Korea that it could speed to their countries and it wouldn’t stop until everything was gone.    

We may never know what happened, but events in today’s news are a reminder to me of that time when I was there, and I saw how close we came. I believe that cooler heads in China, Russia, and North Korea prevailed.  They knew we had a very large number of nuclear weapons and would use them if threatened, but China and Russia had them as well.  

I believe the fact that we did have nuclear weapons and advanced aircraft to deliver them was possibly the reason why we didn’t go to war.  What’s interesting to me is that at that time, and even now, the world didn’t know how close we came to World War III, but I was there!        

May GOD continue to bless this beautiful planet and let’s do everything we can to keep it special and alive!                         

Former Captain Jerald Drobesh US AIR FORCE stationed at Mather Air Force Base in the 1970s before retirement. Now living in Rancho Cordova, CA.

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Advanced Home Health and Hospice Announces Excelin Home Health Partnership

By Advanced Home Health and Hospice  |  2018-07-05

Angela Sehr

SACRAMENTO REGION, CA (MPG) - Advanced Home Health and Hospice (“Advanced”) is excited to announce that it is joining with Excelin Home Health (“Excelin”), and its family of affiliated Texas home health agencies. By joining forces with Excelin, Advanced is expanding its footprint from Sacramento, San Diego and North Bay California to Houston and South-Central Texas.

The company will continue its patient-centric, outcome-focused approach to providing quality home health care. The company will continue to provide skilled nursing, physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, medical social work, home health aides, and hospice services in the comfort of patients’ homes. Building on its strong reputation in home infusion, wound care, cardiovascular care, and home rehabilitation programs, the company will continue to expand its clinical capabilities and strive to remain the home health and hospice provider of choice. As a best-in-class post-acute care provider, the company is focused on leveraging technology and innovative approaches in its relentless pursuit of delivering exceptional patient care and outcomes.

Angela Sehr, RN and founder of Advanced, will remain a key shareholder and will continue as a leader within the organization, providing inspiration, innovation, strategic leadership, and guidance for the agencies.

“I am very pleased to partner with Excelin, Corinthian Capital, and Palomar Capital Management. They share our values and vision.  They have shown a genuine focus on and appreciation for the importance of quality patient care. They have also demonstrated a deep understanding of the rewards and challenges of caring for patients in their homes. I believe they will be outstanding, value-added partners. I cannot be happier than to be partnering with them going forward,” said Angela Sehr.  The closing is subject to regulatory approval.

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SACRAMENTO REGION, CA (MPG) - The Sacramento Metropolitan Air Quality Management District, in consultation with Sacramento County Public Health Officer, Dr. Olivia Kasirye, is advising residents to take precautions and minimize outdoor activities during the afternoon of Monday, July 2 and on Tuesday, July 3 due to smoke being transported into Sacramento County from the County Fire burning in Yolo County and Napa County.

If you smell or see smoke, take the following actions:

  • Everyone should minimize outdoor activities if you can see or smell smoke, even if you’re healthy
  • Children, the elderly and people with respiratory or heart conditions should be particularly careful to avoid exposure
  • Stay indoors with doors and windows closed as much as possible
  • Asthmatics should follow their asthma management plan
  • Contact your doctor if you have symptoms of cough, shortness of breath, or other symptoms you believe to be caused by smoke
  • Those with heart disease should especially limit their smoke exposure since PM can cause heart attacks

"The smoke from wildfires can pose a health risk for anyone, but is especially harmful for older adults, young children, and those with existing health conditions,” said Sacramento County Public Health Officer, Dr. Olivia Kasirye. “If you see or smell smoke limit outdoor activities,” she added.

Check current conditions for the Sacramento region at www.SpareTheAir.com/wildfire.cfm.

To know what you’re breathing, download the free Sacramento Region Air Quality app or sign up for Air Alert emails at www.SpareTheAir.com.

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Dave Dravecky Pays Visit to Raley Field

Story and photo by Rich Peters, MPG Editor  |  2018-06-29

A long line of fans waited to meet Dave Dravecky on a hot Friday night. Doyle and Rhonda Radford and their children Mason and Ellie were happy to get a few autographs from the former Giant.

Former Giant Throws Out First Pitch

WEST SACRAMENTO, CA (MPG) - Former San Francisco Giant Dave Dravecky was honored by the Sacramento River Cats last Friday night. Dravecky held a meet and greet with fans prior to the game before throwing out the first pitch and then taking the time to sign autographs for a long line of fans during the early innings.

Dravecky played in parts of eight seasons with the San Diego Padres and San Francisco Giants from 1982-1989. He made his Major League debut with the Padres on June 15, 1982 and was an all-star in 1983. The left-hander was acquired by San Francisco in 1987 and was 11-7 with a 3.22 ERA in 27 starts for the Giants.

A cancerous tumor was found in Dravecky’s throwing arm in 1988 and, after a brief comeback, unfortunately ended his career during the Giants 1989 World Series run.

After several surgeries, his left arm continued to deteriorate. On June 18, 1991, less than two years after his comeback with the Giants, Dravecky's left arm and shoulder were amputated. While his baseball career came to an end, Dravecky has since gone on to have a successful career as an author and motivational speaker.

“The challenges I’ve faced in the years following have taught me volumes and I now travel the country sharing the lessons I’ve learned—lessons on how to navigate loss and suffering, and how to experience encouragement and hope,” says Dravecky.

His story is an inspiration to Giants fans, baseball enthusiasts and beyond and that was clear to see through the admiration that he was shown at Raley Field. Visit davedravecky.com for more of his story.

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